Dating antique glassware

Backstamps On the bottom of most every genuine Pyrex opalware article is an embossed set of markings which contains a variety of information. The backstamp seen on various items prior to that echoes a Mac Beth-Evans trademark, but one not previously used on their glassware: that of a glassblower, or "gaffer", nicknamed "Little Joe". Since pattern collections and promotional pieces were available for relatively finite periods, knowing their years of introduction and discontinuance can also help narrow down dating somewhat.

While technically a trademark, it is most often seen referred to as a backstamp. The configuration of the backstamp would undergo a few revisions after the introduction of opal glass kitchenware in 1945. A listing of patterns by year of introduction can be found .

The dating of the first antique spoon racks is difficult to determine.

Although it is likely that some spoon racks were being used in the late seventeenth century, it is generally adopted that their popularity and use in America was consistent mostly throughout the eighteenth century, with the use of spoon racks decreasing by the turn of the nineteenth century.

├ A Glossary of Terms ├ Dating Pyrex Kitchenware ├ Pyrex Ware Patterns │├ Pyrex Pattern List │├ Pyrex Pattern Browser │└ Pyrex Pattern Timeline │ ├ Standard Patterns │ └ Non-Standard Patterns ├ Pyrex Opal Ware Shapes ├ Pyrex Model Numbers ├ About Pyrex Item Numbers ├ About Pyrex Colors ├ Pyrex Solid Colors ID Chart ├ Pyrex Promo Accessory ID ├ Vintage Pyrex Advertising ├ Pyrex Catalogs & Brochures ├ Patent Database ├ Videos & Links └ Accessories/Books/Apparel Estimating the age of Pyrex opal glass kitchenware can most often be done by observing a few basic characteristics. Production of opal ware commenced in 1936 after the merger with Mac Beth-Evans Glass Co. The plant there would be used to produce a more durable messware for the military. in a downward curve below forming a broken circle of sorts around the name. No model number or other information was included on the earliest pieces. 1950 or shortly thereafter, the registered trademark symbol "®" was added below the name, the encircling wording became TRADE MARK above the name, with MADE IN U. These appear to be related to either molds or production runs. Patterns The first pieces to have a decorative graphical pattern applied appear to have debuted in 1956.

While colors and styles of decoration reflected consumer tastes at the time of production, the first thing to look at is the backstamp. But the product would not be branded Pyrex until the debut of kitchenware made from it nearly a decade later. New patterns were introduced in keeping with changing tastes, so they can also give clues as to time period.

The absence of the knife box on the earlier examples may be due to the fact individuals normally carried a pocket knife with them at all times to be used for various reasons, including use at the table.

Some have a Rising sun motif at the top, distinguished from the full-circle sunburst.Many Scandinavian spoon racks have an almost lace-like casement, while older Dutch racks are found with several coats of paint, and often tend to have greatly obscured details.By the middle of the nineteenth century, silver spoon vases were used to store and display spoons, and by 1870 revolving silverplated spoon racks had become popular.The majority of early American spoon racks were found on the Maine coast, usually in areas settled by Dutch and Swedes, along the Hudson River, in and around northern New Jersey, and along the Delaware.It is often difficult to distinguish between the antique spoon racks of the Dutch and Swedes because of the similarities in design.

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